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David Thompson records first written description of the Sanpoil Indians and the landscape along the Columbia between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Sanpoil River on July 3, 1811.

On July 3, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) embarks from Kettle Falls on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his scientific work as a geographe...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Nespelem Indians and landscape along the Columbia from the mouth of the Sanpoil through Nespelem Canyon on July 4 and July 5, 1811.

On July 4-5, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Nespelem Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Sanpoil R...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Methow Indians and landscape along the Columbia between Nespelem Canyon and the mouth of the Wenatchee on July 6, 1811.

On July 6, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) records the first written description of the Methow Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Nespelem Canyon to the mouth...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Sinkayuse Indians and the landscape along the Columbia between the mouth of the Wenatchee River and Crab Creek on July 7, 1811.

On July 7, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Sinkayuse Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Wenatchee ...

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David Thompson records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and of the landscape along the Columbia between Crab Creek (present-day Grant County) and the mouth of the Snake River (near present-day Pasco and Kennewick) on July 8-9, 1811.

On July 8-9, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Crab Creek (present-day Gra...

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David Thompson plants the British flag at the confluence of the Columbia and Snake rivers on July 9, 1811.

On July 9, 1811, at the mouth of the Snake River where it joins the Columbia, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) erects a pole with a sign claiming the surrounding country for Great Britain....

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David Thompson of the North West Company surveys Celilo Falls, The Dalles, and Cascades Rapids on the lower Columbia River on July 11-13, 1811.

On July 11, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches Celilo Falls on the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. Over the next three days, Thompson survey...

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David Thompson, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company, reaches the mouth of the Columbia River and meets with Pacific Fur Company agents at Astoria on July 15, 1811.

On July 15, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. In addition to his scientific work as a geog...

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David Thompson surveys Cape Disappointment, visits a Chinook village near the mouth of Columbia River, and meets Chief Comcomly on July 18, 1811.

On July 18, 1811, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company David Thompson (1770-1857) surveys the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. The firs...

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Representatives from the North West Company of Canada and the Pacific Fur Company of New York make the first ascent of the lower Columbia River for commercial purposes beginning on July 22, 1811.

From July 22 to 31, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) ascends the lower Columbia River, accompanied by members of the Pacific Fur Company of New York, who have just established a post...

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David Thompson visits Palus Indians along the lower Snake River and records the first written description of an overland trail from the mouth of the Palouse River to the Spokane River between August 5 and August 13, 1811.

In early August 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) and a small crew ascend the lower Snake River, visiting a succession of Palus Indian encampments along the way. At a village at the ...

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First Hawaiian to visit the Inland Northwest reaches Spokane House on August 13, 1811.

On August 13, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) and his crew arrive at the fur-trading post Spokane House on their return from the Pacific, bringing with them a Hawaiian Islander whom...

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