Library Search Results

Your search found :
and
Per Page:

David Douglas arrives at Fort Vancouver to begin two years of botanical exploration on April 20, 1825.

On April 20, 1825, David Douglas (1799-1834) arrives at Fort Vancouver, the Hudson's Bay Company's new Columbia River headquarters, in the company of chief factor Dr. John McLoughlin (1784-1857). The...

Read More

Hudson's Bay Company begins constructing Fort Colvile near Kettle Falls in early August 1825.

In early August 1825, the Hudson's Bay Company begins constructing Fort Colvile as a trading post. Fort Colvile is located at the upper end of the two-mile portage around Kettle Falls on the Columbia ...

Read More

David Douglas makes the first recorded ascent of the Cascade Mountains above the Columbia River Gorge in September 1825.

On September 3, 1825, exploring naturalist David Douglas (1799-1834) sets out from an Upper Chinookan village at the Cascades of the Columbia River to climb the mountain ridges above the Cascades in p...

Read More

David Douglas visits Jaco Finlay at old Spokane House in May 1826.

In May 1826, Scottish botanist David Douglas (1799-1834) is guided south through the Colville Valley by two sons of retired fur trader Jacques Raphael "Jaco" Finlay (1768-1828), the founder of Spokane...

Read More

Hudson's Bay Company establishes Fort Nisqually, first non-Native settlement on Puget Sound, in April 1833.

In spring 1833, the Hudson's Bay Company dispatches Archibald McDonald to Puget Sound from Fort Vancouver, on the Columbia River near present-day Portland, Oregon. McDonald establishes a stockade and ...

Read More

Earthquake shakes Puget Sound on June 29, 1833.

On June 29, 1833, an earthquake shakes the Puget Sound region. William Tolmie, recently the Hudson's Bay Company officer in charge of Fort Nisqually, records the event in his journal. Tolmie's journa...

Read More

First Japanese known to reach the future Washington state arrive in January 1834.

Sometime in January 1834, three young Japanese sailors run aground on the Olympic Peninsula in a disabled ship. They are inadvertent travelers, blown off course by a storm, then carried by ocean curre...

Read More

Missionaries Marcus and Narcissa Whitman begin their journey to the Northwest, one day after their wedding, on February 19, 1836.

On February 19, 1836 -- one day after their wedding -- missionaries Marcus Whitman (1802-1847) and Narcissa Prentiss Whitman (1808-1847) begin a seven-month, 3,000-mile journey from New York State to ...

Read More

Steamship Beaver departs Fort Vancouver on her first Northwest journey on June 18, 1836.

On June 18, 1836, the Hudson's Bay Company ship Beaver, the first steamship to travel on Puget Sound, departs Fort Vancouver for her first journey in the Pacific Northwest. The vessel carries two 35-h...

Read More

Whitman-Spalding missionary party arrives at Fort Vancouver on September 12, 1836.

On September 12, 1836, missionaries Marcus Whitman (1802-1847) and Henry Spalding (1803-1874) and their respective wives, Narcissa (1808-1847) and Eliza (1807-1851), arrive at Fort Vancouver after a s...

Read More

Dr. Marcus Whitman establishes a mission at Waiilatpu on October 16, 1836.

On October 16, 1836, Dr. Marcus Whitman (1802-1847), a Presbyterian missionary and a physician, establishes a mission at Waiilatpu on the Walla Walla River. He chooses the site because of its proximit...

Read More

Missionary women organize the Columbia Maternal Association, the first women's club in the Northwest, on September 3, 1838.

On September 3, 1838, the wives of six pioneer missionaries meet at the Whitman mission at Waiilatpu (near present-day Walla Walla) and organize the Columbia Maternal Association, the first women's cl...

Read More