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Library Search Results: Abstracts

Your search for RiversInTime found 201 files.
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Cyberpedias & Features (Alphabetical)
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Showing 1 - 20 of 23 results

Cedar River Cybertour

This is a Rivers in Time "Cybertour" of the Cedar River, home of Seattle's watershed since 1901. Curated by Alan J. Stein. Presented by King County, Seattle Public Utilities, and Seattle City Light.
File 7043: Full Text >

Cedar River Watershed (King County) -- Environmental Overview

The Cedar River watershed, located in the eastern central portion of King County, Washington, is nearly 24 miles long, and roughly 10 miles wide. It has been in use as Seattle's main water supply since 1901. This has resulted in many changes to the land, water, forests, and animal habitats within the 91,400-acre environment.
File 2486: Full Text >

Columbia River Cybertour

This Cybertour of the Columbia River focuses on state and national parks and wildlife areas. It was written and curated by Cassandra Tate and photographed (except for historical pictures) by Glenn Drosendahl. It was made possible by a grant from the Peach Foundation and an appropriation by the Washington State Legislature.
File 7611: Full Text >

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

The Columbia River Gorge is a symphony of water and rock, a 90-mile-long passageway sliced through the Cascade Mountains by a river on its way to the sea. The mountains divide the Pacific Northwest into two dramatically different regions; the Gorge is a link that brings them together. On the eastern end are the treeless, scorch-colored hills of the arid Columbia Basin. To the west lie mossy forests of spruce and fir, set off by basalt cliffs ribboned with waterfalls. Congress paid tribute to the Gorge's natural beauty by designating it a National Scenic Area in 1986. But the Gorge is more than just scenery. Native Americans gathered here to fish, trade, and socialize for thousands of years. The Northwest's first railway, first system of locks, and first modern highway were all built in or near the Gorge. Today the area is a laboratory for an experiment in public policy, with the federal government, two states, six counties, dozens of communities, and scores of special interest groups involved in a delicate dance to balance environmental protection and economic development.
File 7567: Full Text >

Daroga State Park

Daroga State Park, on the east bank of the Columbia River in North Central Washington, was once part of an orchard and ranch operated by legendary fruit grower Grady Auvil, who introduced Red Haven peaches, Granny Smith apples, Rainier cherries, and many other new fruits to the Northwest. Auvil moved to higher ground in the late 1950s when the Chelan County Public Utility District (PUD) began building Rocky Reach Dam. The reservoir behind the dam, called Lake Entiat, inundated part of the original orchard. The PUD bought the rest in 1981, developed it as a park, and leased it to the state. The park is an incongruous oasis of deeply watered lawns and full-service campsites, bisected by several huge, high-voltage transmission towers, painted bright orange and white. Kite flying is strictly prohibited because of the network of power lines overhead, humming with electricity from the dam that turned this section of the once-muscular Columbia into a well-mannered lake.
File 7535: Full Text >

Duwamish Waterway map superimposed on a map of the formerly winding Duwamish River

Click here for a map that shows the straight and deep Duwamish Waterway superimposed on the formerly meandering Duwamish River. The Duwamish River flowed through south Seattle into Elliott Bay. The straightening of the river began in October 1913. Map from Duwamish Diary by R. Foisy, 1949.
File 2993: Full Text >

Grand Coulee Dam

Grand Coulee Dam, hailed as the "Eighth Wonder of the World" when it was completed in 1941, is as confounding to the human eye as an elephant might be to an ant. It girdles the Columbia River with 12 million cubic yards of concrete, stacked one mile wide and as tall as a 46-story building, backing up a 150-mile long reservoir, spinning out more kilowatts than any other dam in the United States. As gargantuan as it is, Grand Coulee is only part of the massive Columbia Basin Project, which includes four other dams, three storage lakes, and 2,300 miles of irrigation canals, snaking through half a million acres of desert. No other public works project has had a greater impact on the development of the Pacific Northwest. However, the social and environmental costs have been so severe, according to a study released in 2000, that Grand Coulee probably could not be built today.
File 7264: Full Text >

Contains Audio/Video

Hanford Reach National Monument

The Hanford Reach National Monument -- one of the most important wildlife refuges in Washington state -- is an inadvertent legacy of the United States' nuclear weapons program. Lands within the monument originally served as a buffer around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. For nearly half a century, Hanford was the primary source of plutonium for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The need for secrecy and security kept the surrounding area free from development. Wildlife flourished, even in the shadows of the reactors that produced, along with plutonium, some of the most toxic waste in the world. The reservation itself remains off limits to the public, while it undergoes the most complicated and costly cleanup in history. But it is encircled by an ecological treasure trove, including the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River, the most valuable salmon spawning grounds left on the river, and the largest remnant of undisturbed shrub-steppe habitat in eastern Washington.
File 7438: Full Text >

Howard A. Hanson Dam

Dedicated in 1962, the Howard A. Hanson Dam brought necessary flood relief to the Green River Valley, and opened the way for increased valley development. Named for Seattle attorney and state legislator Howard A. Hanson (d. 1957), who campaigned long and hard for the project, the dam has changed South King County from flooded farmlands to a sea of warehouses, industrial plants, condominiums, and shopping centers.
File 3549: Full Text >

Inchelium-Gifford Ferry

The Inchelium-Gifford Ferry -- also called the Gif -- is operated on Lake Roosevelt by the Colville Confederated Tribes on behalf of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The run connects Inchelium with State Route 25 in Stevens County and has been in operation since 1898.
File 8035: Full Text >

Kettle Falls

Kettle Falls, on the upper Columbia River about 40 miles south of the Canadian border, was once one of the most important fishing and gathering places for Native Americans in the Northwest. Salish speakers called it Shonitkwu, meaning roaring or noisy waters. The sound of the river, plunging nearly 50 feet in a series of cascades, could be heard for miles. It was said that the salmon ran so thick here that it was impossible to throw a stick into the water without hitting a fish. All this came to an end in 1941, with the completion of Grand Coulee Dam, located about 100 miles downstream. The dam, built without a passage for fish, closed the upper Columbia and its tributaries to migrating salmon. Today, the noise at Kettle Falls comes not from rushing water but from nearby Highway 395. The falls themselves are just slabs of quartzite, buried deep beneath the surface of a reservoir called Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake.
File 7577: Full Text >

McNary National Wildlife Refuge

The McNary National Wildlife Refuge, on the east bank of the Columbia River near its confluence with the Snake, was established in 1954 in an effort to compensate for the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of McNary Dam. With nearly 16,000 acres of marshes, mudflats, and shrub-steppe uplands, the refuge has become an important feeding and resting area for migratory birds and waterfowl. Its bays and shorelines serve as nurseries and passageways to spawning grounds for endangered steelhead, sockeye, and Chinook salmon. However, like other wildlife preserves on the mid-Columbia, McNary has proven to be a better haven for avian life than for fisheries. Indeed, one of the many threats facing the river's fish stocks today is the increasing population of American white pelicans and other predators, which now flourish in areas where they were once uncommon, drawn by McNary and other refuges.
File 7493: Full Text >

Mud Mountain Dam

When Mud Mountain Dam was completed in 1948, it was the highest rock- and earth-filled dam in the world. The dam was built to prevent massive flooding in South King County and North Pierce County, which used to occur almost annually. Its reservoir contains water filled with glacier flour, which gives the White River its appearance and name.
File 3584: Full Text >

Now & Then -- Renton Flood, Seattle Famine

This essay contains Seattle historian and photographer Paul Dorpat's Now & Then photographs and reflections on the November 1911 flood on the Cedar River and the damage it caused downstream in Renton, and in Seattle where, ironically, the flood led to a water famine.
File 2574: Full Text >

Pend Oreille River (Boundary Dam) Hydroelectric Project

Seattle City Light's Boundary Dam on the Pend Orielle River, in Northeastern Washington near the Idaho border, today (2003) supplies half the hydroelectric power for Seattle (a quarter of Seattle's power from all sources). Completed in 1967, its generating capacity almost doubled in the 1980s with the addition of two more turbines.
File 5198: Full Text >

Port of Longview

The Port of Longview is located in Cowlitz County on the Columbia River, 66 miles from the Pacific Ocean in southwest Washington state. It is the first full-service port with strategic intermodal connections on the shipping channel. The Port district encompasses the northwest part of Cowlitz County, stretching from just north of Kalama to Lewis County. Originally established as the Port of Kelso in 1921, the name was officially changed in 1929, by a vote of the people, to the Port of Longview. Today (2008) its waterfront facilities include eight full-service marine terminals and two large industrial parks with direct access to rail lines and Interstate 5. From its founding, the Port of Longview has contributed greatly to the economy of the region and state by providing jobs and by promoting trade and investments.
File 8559: Full Text >

Salmon Stories of Puget Sound Lushootseed-speaking Peoples

For centuries, salmon have been intrinsic to the culture and subsistence of the Native peoples of King County. For Lushootseed-speaking groups living along rivers and streams where salmon spawn in the Puget Sound Basin, salmon appeared frequently in stories and Salmon as a spiritual being was important in spiritual life. This essay describes the place of salmon in Puget Sound Native culture, spirituality, and story.
File 2942: Full Text >

Seattle City Light -- Bill Newby Working on the Skagit, 1935-1996 -- A Slideshow Photo Essay

This photo essay is by Bill Newby, Seattle City Light's Director of Operations for the Skagit River dam project. Edited and curated by David Wilma.
File 7040: Full Text >

Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie Falls is a 276-foot waterfall on the Snoqualmie River about 30 miles east of Seattle on the way to Snoqualmie Pass. The falls have been for generations a sacred site for the Snoqualmie Tribe and a source of hydraulic power. In the 1990s, it is the second-most visited tourist attraction in Washington state, after Mt. Rainier.
File 281: Full Text >

South King County Rivers Cybertour

A Rivers in Time Project "Cybertour" tracing the South King County river system. Since the arrival of King County's first white settlers in 1851, the White, Green, Black and Duwamish rivers have undergone many changes. The natural flow of water was altered to halt flooding, and this in turn altered the course of commercial and housing development throughout the region. This guided Cybertour was written by Alan Stein, produced by Chris Goodman, and funded by a 2000/2001 Hotel/Motel Tax Special Projects Grant from the King County Landmarks & Heritage Commission.
File 7058: Full Text >

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Showing 1 - 20 of 172 results

Landslide blocks the Columbia River in about 1450.

In about 1450, an immense landslide tumbles off Table Mountain in Skamania County and completely blocks the Columbia River, shoving it a mile off course. A lake forms behind the dam extending as far as 100 miles. The river will eventually breach the dam causing a 100-foot-deep flood downstream and creating the Cascades rapids. This is the most recent of four documented slides in the 14-square-mile Cascade Landslide Complex and will be called the Bonneville Landslide.
File 7797: Full Text >

Captain Robert Gray becomes the first non-Indian navigator to enter the Columbia River, which he later names, on May 11, 1792.

On May 11, 1792, American fur trader Robert Gray (1755-1806) enters the major river of the Pacific Northwest in his ship the Columbia Rediviva. Indian peoples have lived and navigated along Wimahl ("Big River") for tens of thousands of years, and Europeans have been sailing the Northwest Coast for more than 200 years. However, Gray is the first non-Indian to succeed in entering Wimahl, which he renames the Columbia River after his ship.
File 5051: Full Text >

Captain Robert Gray explores Grays Bay and charts the mouth of Grays River in May 1792.

Around May 14 through 17, 1792, American fur trader Robert Gray (1755-1806) explores Grays Bay on the Columbia River shore of present-day Wahkiakum County, and charts the outlet of Grays River where it enters the Bay. Grays Bay is an embayment on the north bank about 20 miles upstream from the mouth of the Columbia River. The various branches of Grays River rise in the Willapa Hills on the boundary ridge between Lewis and Wahkiakum Counties in southwest Washington, draining 124 square miles before flowing into the Columbia at Grays Bay. Both are named for Robert Gray.
File 5052: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark reach the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers on October 16, 1805.

On October 16, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition reaches the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers at present-day Pasco, beginning the final leg of 4,000-mile journey of exploration from St. Louis, Missouri, to the Pacific Ocean.
File 5337: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark begin descending the rapids of the Columbia River at Celilo Falls on October 22, 1805.

On October 22, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery encounter Celilo Falls, at the beginning of a 55-mile stretch of the Columbia River that will prove to be the most difficult and dangerous part of their journey through the Pacific Northwest.
File 5355: Full Text >

Jaco Finlay guides five Iroquois trappers to the Columbia in June 1808.

In the summer of 1808, Jacques Raphael "Jaco" Finlay (1768-1828) guides five Iroquois trappers from eastern Canada across the Continental Divide. Finlay, a "free hunter" and former and future clerk for the fur-trading North West Company, brings the eastern Indians to trap beaver with him in the firm's newly established Columbia District. Known only by their first names -- Joseph, Pierre, Ignace, Martin, and Jacques -- these men, and those who follow them west, will change the economic and social fabric of the Inland Northwest. After Finlay establishes Spokane House near present-day Spokane in 1810, many of the Iroquois will settle nearby in the Colville Valley.
File 8412: Full Text >

Fur trader David Thompson explores the Pend Oreille River in September and October 1809.

From September 27 through October 6, 1809, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) scouts the Pend Oreille River from Lake Pend Oreille in Idaho, downstream through what is now Pend Oreille County in the northeastern corner of Washington. He and the French Canadian voyageur accompanying him are the first non-Indians to reach the area. Thompson, a trader, surveyor, and mapmaker for the North West Company, is exploring the tributaries of the upper Columbia River for sources of beaver and other furs and for routes to get those furs to market.
File 5097: Full Text >

The ship Tonquin out of New York City sights the mouth of the Columbia River on March 22, 1811.

On March 22, 1811, the ship Tonquin out of New York City sights the mouth of the Columbia River. The Tonquin is owned by fur baron John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) of New York and carries charter members of the Pacific Fur Company, who intend to establish the first American trading post on the Columbia. The ship struggles for two days to cross the perilous bar, losing eight sailors before anchoring in Baker's Bay.
File 8673: Full Text >

Astorians trade with Chinook and Clatsop Indians in April 1811.

During the first weeks of April 1811, members of the Pacific Fur Company trade with the local Chinook and Clatsop Indians while a small party scouts the north shore of the Columbia River and journeys upstream in search of a suitable building site for the first American trading post on the Columbia. The Astorians, as they are known, are the vanguard of a new business enterprise by fur baron John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) of New York. Astor intends to establish a commercial fur empire in the Northwest as well as a transcontinental trade network between the Missouri and the Pacific coast.
File 8675: Full Text >

David Thompson visits Kalispel Indians on Pend Oreille River beginning June 8, 1811.

In early June 1811, David Thompson (1770-1857), Canadian explorer, geographer, and fur trader, visits a village of Kalispel Indians on the Pend Oreille River, then travels to Spokane House, the North West Company's trading post at the confluence of the Spokane and Little Spokane Rivers, approximately nine miles west of the present city of Spokane. Thompson, a partner with the North West Company of Montreal, has recently pioneered a new trade route across Athabasca Pass in the Canadian Rockies, and brings fresh trade goods for Spokane House. During a four-day visit, he trades with local Spokane bands and makes astronomical observations to calculate the latitude and longitude of the post.
File 8676: Full Text >

David Thompson party reaches Kettle Falls on the Columbia River on June 19, 1811.

On June 19, 1811, a party of Canadian fur traders from the North West Company, led by explorer and mapmaker David Thompson (1770-1857), reaches Kettle Falls on the Columbia River. For many years, the falls have been a major fishing spot and gathering place for the inhabitants of the region, now called the Colville Indians. The "Nor'Westers," who arrive at the beginning of the first salmon run of the summer, are preparing to descend the Columbia River to its mouth some 700 miles downstream. The site of Kettle Falls, where the Columbia forms the boundary between Stevens and Ferry Counties, is around 30 miles south of the Canadian border. The falls themselves no longer exist; their churning, boiling cascades have been submerged under Lake Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the backup of the Columbia River formed by Grand Coulee Dam. A town in Stevens County near the former cascades bears the name Kettle Falls.
File 5102: Full Text >

David Thompson records the first written description of the Sanpoil Indians and of the landscape along the Columbia between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Sanpoil River on July 3, 1811.

On July 3, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) embarks from Kettle Falls on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is the first white man to describe contact with the Sanpoil Indians and the Columbia River between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Sanpoil River, located on the present-day Colville Indian Reservation, located in Okanogan and Ferry counties.
File 9006: Full Text >

David Thompson records the first written description of the Nespelem Indians and landscape along the Columbia from the mouth of the Sanpoil through Nespelem Canyon on July 4 and 5, 1811.

On July 4-5, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Nespelem Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Sanpoil River through Nespelem Canyon (modern-day Ferry and Okanogan counties). Thompson embarked from Kettle Falls on July 3 on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, he is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is the first white man to descend the river and make contact with tribes between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Snake River, where he intersects the route of Lewis and Clark from five years earlier. His crew includes French Canadian voyageurs Pierre Pareil and Joseph Cote, translator Michel Boulard, and free hunters Michel Bourdeaux and Francois Gregoire. Two Iroquois Indians called Charles and Ignace paddle at the bow and stern.
File 9007: Full Text >

David Thompson records first written description of the Methow Indians and landscape along the Columbia between Nespelem Canyon and the mouth of the Wenatchee on July 6, 1811.

On July 6, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) records the first written description of the Methow Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Nespelem Canyon to the mouth of the Wenatchee River (present-day Ferry and Okanogan counties). Thompson embarked from Kettle Falls on July 3 on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is the first white man to descend the river and make contact with tribes between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Snake River, where he intersects the route of Lewis and Clark from five years earlier. His crew includes French Canadian voyageurs Pierre Pareil and Joseph Cote, translator Michel Boulard, and free hunters Michel Bourdeaux and Francois Gregoire. Two Iroquois Indians called Charles and Ignace paddle at the bow and stern.
File 9008: Full Text >

David Thompson records the first written description of Sinkayuse Indians and of landscape along the Columbia between the mouth of the Wenatchee River and Crab Creek (present-day Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Kittitas counties) on July 7, 1811.

On July 7, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Sinkayuse Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Wenatchee River (near present-day Wenatchee) to Crab Creek, in present-day Chelan, Douglas, and Kittitas counties. Thompson had embarked from Kettle Falls on July 3 on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is the first white man to descend the river and make contact with tribes between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Snake River, where he intersects the route of Lewis and Clark from five years earlier. His crew includes French Canadian voyageurs Pierre Pareil and Joseph Cote, translator Michel Boulard, and free hunters Michel Bourdeaux and Francois Gregoire. Two Iroquois Indians called Charles and Ignace paddle at the bow and stern.
File 9009: Full Text >

David Thompson records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and of the landscape along the Columbia between Crab Creek (present-day Grant County) and the mouth of the Snake River (near present-day Pasco and Kennewick) on July 8-9, 1811.

On July 8-9, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Crab Creek (present-day Grant County) to the mouth of the Snake River (near present-day Pasco and Kennewick in Franklin and Benton counties). Thompson had embarked from Kettle Falls on July 3 on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is the first white man to descend the river and make contact with tribes between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Snake River, where he intersects the route of Lewis and Clark from five years earlier. His crew includes French Canadian voyageurs Pierre Pareil and Joseph Cote, translator Michel Boulard, and free hunters Michel Bourdeaux and Francois Gregoire. Two Iroquois Indians called Charles and Ignace paddle at the the bow and stern.
File 9010: Full Text >

David Thompson plants the British flag at the confluence of the Columbia and Snake rivers on July 9, 1811.

On July 9, 1811, at the mouth of the Snake River where it joins the Columbia, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) erects a pole with a sign claiming the surrounding country for Great Britain. Thompson also leaves a British flag with the Wallula Indians, who control the area. The sign and flag are a statement to the American fur traders of John Jacob Astor's Pacific Fur Company, who are competing with Thompson's North West Company of Canada, then still a British colony. The British claim does not prevail: the confluence of the Snake and Columbia now marks the intersection of Benton, Franklin, and Walla Walla counties in Washington.
File 5096: Full Text >

David Thompson of the North West Company surveys Celilo Falls, The Dalles, and Cascades Rapids on the lower Columbia River on July 11-13, 1811.

On July 11, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches Celilo Falls on the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. Over the next three days, Thompson surveys Celilo Falls, The Dalles, and Cascades Rapids as he continues down the river. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable from its upper reaches to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson is traveling in a cedar plank canoe manned by eight French Canadian and Iroquois paddlers.
File 9178: Full Text >

David Thompson, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company, reaches the mouth of the Columbia River and meets with Pacific Fur Company agents at Astoria on July 15, 1811.

On July 15, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable from its upper reaches to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company. Thompson also carries a message for members of John Jacob Astor's Pacific Fur Company, who have recently reached the mouth of the Columbia on the ship Tonquin to establish a trading post called Astoria.
File 9177: Full Text >

David Thompson surveys Cape Disappointment, visits a Chinook village near the mouth of Columbia River, and meets Chief Comcomly on July 18, 1811.

On July 18, 1811, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company David Thompson (1770-1857) surveys the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. The first European to chart both the headwaters and the mouth of the Columbia, Thompson visits the landmark of Cape Disappointment and the Chinook village of Chief Comcomly. In addition to his scientific work as a geographer, Thompson is the fur agent in charge of the Columbia Department of the North West Company of Canada. He is on a mission to determine whether the Columbia is navigable from its upper reaches to the sea and whether it will provide a viable trade route for the fur company.
File 9179: Full Text >

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Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results

Beginnings of the Columbia Basin Reclamation Project: A Reminiscence by W. Gale Matthews

In early 1952, W. Gale Matthews -- a resident of Grant County since 1890 and, at the time of this account, President of the Grant County Title Abstract Company -- provided his memories of the beginning of the Columbia Basin Reclamation Project. This project to irrigate large parts of the Columbia Basin in Eastern Washington famously gave birth to Grand Coulee Dam, which opened in 1941. Matthews account was transcribed from a speech he gave to the Grant County Historical Society in early 1952, and was edited by Eric L. Flom. Matthews tells of the early ridicule facing this proposal and the war of ideas waged between dam proponents and others advocating a rival irrigation scheme.
File 7963: Full Text >

Dorothea Nordstrand recalls the old Celilo Falls

Nordstrand's reminiscence on Celilo Falls the way they were before the Dalles Dam was built in 1957 first appeared in Columbia magazine, Vol 15, No. 3. In 2009 Dorothea Nordstrand was awarded AKCHO's (Association of King County Historical Organizations) Willard Jue Memorial Award for a Volunteer, for contributing these vivid reminiscences to various venues in our community, including HistoryLink.org's People's History library.
File 5442: Full Text >

Dorothy Graybael Scott Remembers Fire, Wind, Snow, and Floods at Cedar Falls, 1922-1940

This excerpted account of man-made and natural disasters at Cedar Falls (east King County) was originally recorded on June 15, 1993, as a part of the Cedar River Watershed Oral History Project. Dorothy Graybael Scott moved to Cedar Falls in 1922, as a young girl. Her father, Carl Graybael, worked for the Milwaukee Railroad in Cedar Falls, as a substation operator. Cheryl Meyer conducted the interview at Mrs. Scott's North Bend home.
File 2455: Full Text >

Fish Story: Memories of the Cedar River

Homer Venishnick, born in Renton, Washington in 1926, comes from a long line of fishermen whose livelihoods have hinged on the ebb and flow of local rivers. Today he lives in a house he built 50 years ago. "I started it, dug the hole, 50 years in April this year. Cost me $24 dollars to dig the hole. I'm still working on it."
File 2078: Full Text >

Having Fun in Cedar Falls, 1922-1940

Dorothy Graybael Scott's account of family and social life at a Cedar Falls railroad camp (in east King County) was originally recorded on June 15, 1993 as a part of the Cedar River Watershed Oral History Project. Dorothy Graybael Scott moved to Cedar Falls in 1922, as a young girl. Her father, Carl Graybael, worked for the Milwaukee Railroad in Cedar Falls, as a substation operator. Cheryl Meyer conducted the interview at Mrs. Scott's North Bend home.
File 2457: Full Text >

Mementos of a Seattle City Light Skagit River tour

Beginning in the 1920s, Seattle City Light offered tours of its hydroelectric dams on the Skagit River to promote public support of the project. This file contains mementos (a sketch, a program, a tour pass) of a visit by the Women's City Club of Seattle on May 16, 1929. City Light Superintendent J. D. Ross (1872-1939) and City Councilman Otto A. Case personally escorted the excursionists over the project.
File 2894: Full Text >

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