Library Search Results

Your search found :
and
Per Page:

Boy Scouts of America revokes membership of atheist Darrell Lambert on November 5, 2002.

On November 5, 2002, the Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America, revokes the membership of Assistant Scoutmaster Darrell Lambert, who had declared himself an atheist. Lambert is an Eagle Scout a...

Read More

Washington voters reject Referendum 51 transportation-tax package, approve $30 car tab limit, and re-elect the state's U.S. Representatives on November 5, 2002.

On November 5, 2002, Washington voters soundly reject the state Legislature's Referendum 51 transportation plan and gas-tax increase while narrowly approving Tim Eyman's Initiative 776, which caps sta...

Read More

State Senator Jim West from Spokane is named Senate majority leader on November 15, 2002.

On November 15, 2002, state Senator Jim West (1951-2006) from Spokane is named Senate majority leader. In the previous session, West had been the Senate minority leader, but in the fall elections the ...

Read More

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issues a permit for filling wetlands in connection with Sea-Tac International Airport's third runway on December 13, 2002.

On December 13, 2002, the United States Army Corps of Engineers issues to the Port of Seattle a 404 Permit to begin filling wetlands within the area designated for Seattle-Tacoma International Airport...

Read More

Former Washington residents Michael Anderson and William McCool, and five fellow astronauts, die when space shuttle Columbia disintegrates during re-entry on February 1, 2003.

On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia breaks up over Texas during its return to Cape Kennedy from a 16-day scientific mission in orbit. All seven astronauts aboard perish, including pilot US...

Read More

Tens of thousands march in Seattle and other cities to protest war against Iraq on February 15, 2003.

On February 15, 2003, thousands of citizens join an enormous march from Seattle Center to the International District to protest plans for war against Iraq. Estimates of the number of Seattle participa...

Read More

Artists receive an apology from the City of Pasco in censorship lawsuit on March 4, 2003.

On March 4, 2003, the City of Pasco apologizes to artists Sharon Rupp and Janette Hopper, the culmination of lawsuit brought by the artists after their works submitted for display at Pasco City Hall a...

Read More

An Israeli military bulldozer driver kills Rachel Corrie, a 23-year-old peace activist from Olympia, on March 16, 2003.

On March 16, 2003, at approximately 4:45 p.m., an Israeli army bulldozer runs over Rachel Corrie, a 23-year-old peace activist with the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), who stood in the way of...

Read More

Spokane Valley instantly becomes Washington's ninth largest city when incorporation becomes official on March 31, 2003.

On March 31, 2003, Spokane Valley instantly becomes the state's ninth largest city when incorporation becomes official. The new city, which encompasses a number of communities and districts between Sp...

Read More

Seattle pioneer Doc Maynard's gravestone in Seattle's Lake View Cemetery is rededicated on April 19, 2003.

On April 19, 2003, a new headstone is dedicated atop the grave of David S. "Doc" Maynard (1808-1873) at Seattle's Lake View Cemetery. Efforts to replace the old stone, which had become weathered over ...

Read More

Seattle designates the 1962 Monorail as an historic landmark on April 16, 2003.

On April 16, 2003, the Monorail, the popular elevated train built for the 1962 World's Fair, is designated as an official Historic Landmark by a unanimous vote of the Seattle Landmarks Preservation Bo...

Read More

Berthusen Park's barn and privy in Whatcom County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 22, 2003.

On April 22, 2003, an enormous century-old barn and a privy built inside a hollowed-out cedar stump, both located in Berthusen Park three miles northwest of Lynden in Whatcom County near the Canadian ...

Read More

Prize-winning playwright August Wilson premieres autobiographical solo show How I Learned What I Learned at Seattle Repertory Theatre on May 22, 2003.

On May 22, 2003, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson (1945-2005) premieres his autobiographical solo show, How I Learned What I Learned, at the Seattle Repertory Theatre. It is Wilson's on...

Read More

Longview dedicates Weyerhaeuser Centennial Bridge on May 28, 2003.

On May 28, 2003, the City of Longview, in Cowlitz County, dedicates the Weyerhaeuser Centennial Bridge. Also called the Centennial Garden Pedestrian Bridge, the wooden structure connects a small islan...

Read More

Capitol Hill Branch, The Seattle Public Library, opens on May 31, 2003.

On May 31, 2003, The Seattle Public Library's new Capitol Hill Branch opens to the public. The $5 million building replaces the Susan Henry Branch Library, which was built in 1954, at 425 Harvard Aven...

Read More

Former Civic Auditorium and Seattle Center Opera House opens as the Marion Oliver McCaw Hall on June 28, 2003.

On June 28, 2003, the new Marion Oliver McCaw Hall, home to the Pacific Northwest Ballet and the Seattle Opera, opens for its first performances with a gala party. McCaw Hall is the latest incarnation...

Read More

Washington state has its driest summer on record in 2003.

In 2003, Washington State has its driest summer since record keeping began in 1895. A persistent ridge of high pressure stays off the pacific coast all summer, preventing storms from coming ashore. Th...

Read More

Bridge construction project unearths Tse-whit-zen, a largely intact Klallam Indian village, in a major archaeological discovery on August 16, 2003.

On August 16, 2003, workers building a graving dock for the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) near Ediz Hook in Port Angeles uncover a shell midden. Discovery of the refuse pile, a...

Read More

Sound Transit's Tacoma Link light rail system begins operation on August 22, 2003.

On August 22, 2003, Sound Transit's Tacoma Link, the state's first modern light rail system, has its inaugural run in downtown Tacoma. The line is 1.6 miles long and runs from South 9th Street in the ...

Read More

Vinson Cole, Art Corps, Consolidated Works, and the Allen Foundation for the Arts receive the first Seattle Mayor's Arts Awards on August 29, 2003.

On Friday afternoon, August 29, 2003, Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels (b. 1955) presents the first annual Mayor's Arts Awards at Seattle Center as part of opening ceremonies for the city's largest arts fes...

Read More

Ferry Kalakala is auctioned off on September 13, 2003.

On September 13, 2003, the ferry Kalakala is auctioned in absentia at James K. Murphy, Co. in Kenmore, after a one-day viewing of the boat at its north Lake Union moorage. The auction is held to pay o...

Read More

Gary Leon Ridgway pleads guilty to murdering 48 Green River Killer victims on November 5, 2003.

On November 5, 2003, Gary Leon Ridgway pleads guilty to murdering 48 women in King County between 1982 and 1998, solving the mystery of the Green River Killer. Ridgway admitted killing 42 women whom p...

Read More

First U.S. case of mad cow disease is reported in a Mabton dairy cow on December 23, 2003.

On December 23, 2003, Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman announces that a Holstein cow from a dairy herd in Mabton, a small farming town in southeast Yakima County, has tested positive for mad cow dise...

Read More

Rainier Beach Branch, The Seattle Public Library, reopens after $3 million remodel on January 17, 2004.

On January 17, 2004, the Rainier Beach Branch, The Seattle Public Library, reopens after a $3 million remodel. The new building is more than half again as large as the 1981 building, and it includes m...

Read More