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Topic: Infrastructure

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Fourteenth Avenue NW Bridge / Salmon Bay Drawbridge (Seattle)

The Fourteenth Avenue NW Bridge (or Salmon Bay Drawbridge), a Howe-truss swing drawbridge, spanned Salmon Bay between 13th Avenue W and Ballard's 14th Avenue NW. It replaced two side-by-side fixed tre...

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Frank Fitts: An episode in his life that led him to be a dedicated Public Power Advocate

Frank Fitts (1884-1967) grew up in Seattle at the turn of the twentieth century. He was a founder of the Phinney Ridge Improvement Association which worked to extend electrical service in Seattle's No...

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Freight Mobility Strategic Investment Board

The Freight Mobility Strategic Investment Board (FMSIB) is a state agency that works to ease the flow of goods in Washington. It was created by the state legislature in 1998 as part of the first progr...

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Fremont Bridge (Seattle)

The Fremont Bridge, the first double-leaf bascule drawbridge spanning the Lake Washington Ship Canal, opened June 15, 1917, 19 days before the Government Locks at Ballard were officially dedicated. Th...

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Gale, Diana (b. 1941)

Diana Hadden Gale first began public service in the City of Seattle in 1977 and worked for the city for 25 years, 20 of them as a department head or division director. During her long and illustrious ...

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Georgetown Steam Plant (Seattle)

The Georgetown Steam Plant was built by the Boston-based Stone & Webster utilities conglomerate, which held a dominant position in electricity generation and public transportation in the Seattle a...

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Grand Coulee Dam

Grand Coulee Dam, hailed as the "Eighth Wonder of the World" when it was completed in 1941, is as confounding to the human eye as an elephant might be to an ant. It girdles the Columbia River with 12 ...

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Hanford Nuclear Site

Originally known as Hanford Engineer Works, the Hanford Nuclear Site was built in the early 1940s to produce fuel for nuclear weapons, including the atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, an...

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Hanford's N Reactor

Hanford's N Reactor, designed to produce both plutonium for weapons and electricity for the public, was the ninth and final reactor to be constructed at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, located along ...

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Howard A. Hanson Dam

Dedicated in 1962, the Howard A. Hanson Dam brought necessary flood relief to the Green River Valley, and opened the way for increased valley development. Named for Seattle attorney and state legislat...

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Interurban Rail Transit in King County and the Puget Sound Region

Electric interurban railways played a major part in defining early twentieth century transportation routes and growth patterns in King County. Early roads were primitive and before the development of ...

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Kilbourne, Edward Corliss (1856-1959)

E. C. Kilbourne, a Seattle dentist, was the key developer of Seattle's Fremont neighborhood and a leading promoter of electric power utilities in Seattle. In order to bring interested potential homeo...

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King County Landmarks: Norman Bridge (1950), Middle Fork Snoqualmie River, North Bend

Address: at the crossing of 428th Avenue, in Three Forks Park, North Bend. The 295-foot long Norman Bridge, spanning the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River near North Bend, is the only remaining exam...

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King County Landmarks: Red Brick Road/James Mattson Road (1865/1913), vicinity of Redmond

Address: 196th Avenue NE between Union Hill Road & Redmond-Fall City Road, vicinity of Redmond. The Mattson Road contains the longest stretch of exposed historic red brick highway in King County. In 1...

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Landsburg Headworks

Utilizing the Cedar River as Seattle's watershed was the work of City Engineer R. H. Thomson (1856-1949). In 1899, the City called for bids to create headworks, later named Landsburg, upstream from th...

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Langlie, Arthur B. (1900-1966)

Arthur B. Langlie was the only mayor of Seattle to become governor of the state and the only Washington governor to regain that office after losing it. Langlie was born in Minnesota and moved with his...

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Larson Air Force Base -- Grant County International Airport

In November 1942 the United States Army established a training airfield at Moses Lake in central Washington's Grant County. The base became inactive at the end of the war but the airfield, with its lo...

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Managing at Seattle City Light, 1973-1989: an Interview with Walt Sickler

When Walt Sickler (b. 1927) was promoted from line crew foreman to Supervisor of Overhead Construction at Seattle City Light, he brought to the utility's management his knowledge of field operations a...

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Manette Bridge (Kitsap County)

The Manette Bridge, spanning the Port Washington Narrows, connected the Kitsap Peninsula city of Bremerton with Manette, a town annexed by Bremerton in 1918 and located across the narrows. The Manette...

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McNary National Wildlife Refuge

The McNary National Wildlife Refuge, on the east bank of the Columbia River near its confluence with the Snake, was established in 1954 in an effort to compensate for the loss of wildlife habitat due ...

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Mementos of a Seattle City Light Skagit River tour

Beginning in the 1920s, Seattle City Light offered tours of its hydroelectric dams on the Skagit River to promote public support of the project. This file contains mementos (a sketch, a program, a tou...

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Metro: Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle

The Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle, commonly known as Metro, was designed to provide regional solutions for the problems of King County's fast-growing metropolitan area. In 1958, after rejecting...

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Middle Fork Nooksack River Fish Passage Project

The Middle Fork Nooksack River Fish Passage Project is the result of 20 years of studies and planning by the City of Bellingham and tribal, state, and private partners to bring fish back to the upper ...

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Milwaukee Road's S-Curve Trestle (Tacoma)

Starting in the late 1880s and continuing for decades, the delta where the Puyallup River meets Commencement Bay was dredged and filled to serve the needs of shipping and industry. In 1908 the Milwauk...

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