Library Search Results

Topic: Agriculture

Your search found :
and
Per Page:

Agriculture in Washington 1792 to 1900

Washington's soils and climate make it one of the most productive agricultural states in the union. When explorers and fur traders from the East Coast and Europe reached the Northwest in the late 1700...

Read More

Agriculture in Washington since 1900

At the turn of the twentieth century, Washington farmers and ranchers realized they still had much to learn about the land. Washington State College (later University) in Pullman became the center of ...

Read More

American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) of Washington

The U.S. government officially recognizes more than 200 wine-growing regions, known as American Viticultural Areas (AVAs). Fourteen of those AVAs are located partially or entirely within Washington st...

Read More

Associated Vintners -- Washington's Academic Winemakers

Associated Vintners (AV) was a Seattle winemaking firm formed primarily by a group of University of Washington faculty members. Its backstory is perhaps the classic local instance of home garage-based...

Read More

Auburn: A Reminiscence of Childhood by Joseph Koch

Joseph Koch (1920-2000) was a longtime resident of Auburn, a small town located in south King County only a few miles from the Pierce County border. From the time of his retirement in 1962, Joe was on...

Read More

Bellevue Strawberry Festival: Childhood Memories (ca. 1925)

The following short essay was written in 1934 by Bellevue native Patricia Groves Sandbo (b. 1916), a freshman at Seattle Pacific College, for her English II Class. She received an "A" for her story th...

Read More

Benton City -- Thumbnail History

Benton City is a small municipality of some 3,000 residents on the north bank of the Yakima River near the center of Benton County in the Columbia Basin region of southeastern Washington. A hunting an...

Read More

Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge and the Nisqually River Watershed

Located where the Nisqually River empties into southern Puget Sound on the Pierce-Thurston county border, the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge protects the river's estuary, providing...

Read More

Bishop, William Sr. (1833-1906) and Sally Bishop Williams (1840-1916)

After the Puget Sound "Indian War" of 1855-1856, a number of high-status Coast Salish refugees relocated to Chimacum Prairie, south of Port Townsend at the northeast corner of the Olympic Peninsula. T...

Read More

Boeing Employees' Winemakers Club

The Boeing Employees' Winemakers Club (BEWC) originally took flight as a hobbyist organization in 1971 when a small group of Seattle-based aeronautics coworkers, who were also amateur wine enthusiasts...

Read More

Borst, Jeremiah (1830-1890)

Jeremiah Borst is considered to be the father of the Snoqualmie Valley, located in north central King County. A soft-spoken man with a lisp, he was the first permanent non-Indian settler in the valley...

Read More

Bracero Program: Crossing the Border to a New Life by History Day Award Winner Cameron Holt

Cameron Holt's paper won the HistoryLink.org Junior Paper award for her 2012 essay submitted in the Washington state History Day competition. Cameron was a student at Housel Middle School in Prosser, ...

Read More

Brown, Amos (1833-1899) and Alson Lennon Brown (1868-1942)

Amos Brown was a prominent early citizen of Seattle. He was a pioneering lumberman in the Puget Sound region beginning in the 1850s and had substantial real estate holdings in present downtown Seattle...

Read More

Bush, George W. (1790?-1863)

George W. Bush (1790?-1863) was a key leader of the first group of American citizens to settle north of the Columbia River in what is now Washington. Bush was a successful farmer in Missouri, but as a...

Read More

Chateau Ste. Michelle (Woodinville)

Chateau Ste. Michelle is a Woodinville-based winery that is Washington's largest fine-wine producer. The business was built upon the foundation of the state's most successful winemaking firm, Seattle'...

Read More

Coast Salish Camas Cultivation

Camas (Camassia spp) bulbs were harvested and baked as a sweet, fructose-rich food by Native Americans throughout the Great Basin and the Pacific Northwest. Camas meadows or "prairies" were often burn...

Read More

Coast Salish Woolly Dogs

Weaving with spun yarns was a defining characteristic of pre-Contact Coast Salish civilization in the Salish Sea (the marine waterways of what are now Washington and British Columbia), together with t...

Read More

Columbia Basin Reclamation Project, The Beginnings: A Reminiscence by W. Gale Matthews

In early 1952, W. Gale Matthews -- a resident of Grant County since 1890 and, at the time of this account, President of the Grant County Title Abstract Company -- provided his memories of the beginnin...

Read More

Colville Valley (1870s-1880s): A 1928 Memoir by Thomas Graham

In 1928, Thomas Graham (1868-1946) wrote a series of articles in the Colville Examiner titled "50 Years Ago," recounting his experiences and observations as a teenager in the Colville Valley. His fami...

Read More

Combine Harvester: Innovating Modern Wheat Farming by History Day Award Winner Christoper Wiley

This essay by Christopher Wiley on the development of the combine harvester won the 2010 Washington State History Day award presented by HistoryLink.org for Outstanding Essay on Washington State Histo...

Read More

Dairy Farming in Washington

In 2016, milk was the second highest valued commodity in Washington behind apples, with some 90 percent of the milk produced in the state also processed there. The first substantial herd of cattle arr...

Read More

Davis, James S. "Cashup" (1815-1896)

Randall A. Johnson wrote this article about Palouse pioneer James S. "Cashup" Davis in 1968 for The Pacific Northwesterner, the quarterly publication of the Spokane Westerners Corral. Johnson was born...

Read More

Desimone, Joe: From Produce Farmer to Owner of Seattle's Pike Place Market

Giuseppe "Joe" Desimone, an immigrant from Naples, settled in Seattle's South Park neighborhood, where he made some money farming and more money investing in real estate. Like many immigrant farmers f...

Read More

Donation Land Law, also known as the Oregon Land Law

The Donation Land Law of 1850, or Oregon Land Law, permitted settlers on unsurveyed lands to select claims of 320 acres per settler (640 acres per married couple) provided they resided there for four ...

Read More