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Topic: People's Histories

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Junior Safety Patrol: A Reminiscence of Loyal Heights Elementary School (Seattle)

Former Seattle resident John M. Leggett offers this account of participating in the Junior Safety Patrol during the 1930s while attending Seattle's Loyal Heights Elementary School. Called the Schoolbo...

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K2 Corporation (K2 Sports) -- a History

This history of the Vashon Island firm K2, manufacturer of fiberglass skis, and later of snowboards and in-line skates, was submitted by Andy Luhn, marketing director of the firm. Company founder Bill...

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Keepers of the Light -- The Settles Family at Lime Kiln Lighthouse (San Juan Island)

Arvel and Helga Settles, with their five children, spent seven years (1935-1942) as keepers at the Lime Kiln Lighthouse on San Juan Island, in the Salish Sea between the Northwest Washington mainland ...

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Kingdome: 25 Years Later: Veteran Idealist Frank Ruano Speaks Out

This is an interview of Frank Ruano (1920-2005), an outspoken critic of Seattle's Kingdome stadium, which opened on March 27, 1976, and was imploded on March 26, 2000. The interview was conducted in S...

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Kirk, Priscilla Maunder: An Oral History

Priscilla Maunder Kirk (1898-1992), an African American Seattleite, was born on August 9, 1898, in Seattle. In 1919 she moved to Montana with her husband, where she lived until 1929. She also lived in...

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Kombol, Lulu Mildred (1885-1977): Growing up on the Cowlitz River

Lulu Mildred (Shircliff) Kombol was born on August 27, 1885, in Walla Walla.She wrote her autobiography at age 89 while living in Seattle with a daughter. Her original account has been slightly expand...

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Kurt Cobain: Seven Years Later -- a Reflection by Clark Humphrey

Kurt Cobain (1967-1994) was the lead singer of the Seattle grunge band Nirvana. He commited suicide in 1994. In this People's History Clark Humphrey reflects on his life and music.

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Lacrosse in Seattle: The Forgotten Early History

The first documented game of lacrosse in Seattle was played in 1896, between two teams from British Columbia, Canada. The original Seattle Lacrosse Club was formed in 1900. Many of its players came fr...

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Lake Forest Park -- 1912 Promotional Brochure

This is the complete text of a promotional brochure written in 1912 by real estate developer Ole Hanson (1874-1940). The brochure extols the wondrous virtues of living in idyllic Lake Forest Park, loc...

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Last Days of the Alaskan Way Viaduct

Beloved for its convenience and breathtaking views but derided as an architectual eyesore, the Alaskan Way Viaduct ferried motorists through downtown Seattle for more than six decades before it was to...

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Lasting Friendship: a Reminiscence of Margaret (Bavin) Medley by Dorothea (Pfister) Nordstrand

This reminiscence of an old friendship was written by Dorothea (Pfister) Nordstrand (1916-2011). Both she and her friend, Margaret (Bavin) Medley (1915-2006), were graduates of Seattle's Roosevelt Hig...

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Lawson Mine Disaster (November 6, 1910): Official Investigative Reports

Sixteen men, all foreign-born, were killed on November 6, 1910, in an explosion at the Lawson Coal Mine in Black Diamond in east King County. The following is excerpted from the "State Inspector of Co...

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Legal But Limited: Abortion in 1974

This is a harrowing account of a legal abortion which resulted in complications that received inadequate care. It is written by Janet Creighton and excerpted from the June 1974 issue of From the Groun...

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Legeros, Chris (1952-2015)

Chris Legeros was a longtime reporter and anchor at KIRO 7 in Seattle, spending 31 years at the CBS affiliate. He started his 39-year journalism career at WTCN TV and WWTC radio in Minneapolis and in ...

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Leonard Gayton Family

This People's History relates the history of the Leonard Gayton family. The jazz drummer, jazz singer, and band leader Leonard Gayton (1908-1982) was the fourth child of the early African American res...

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Lessons in Life: Dorothea Nordstrand Remembers her Years at Seattle's Green Lake State Bank

In this People's History Dorothea (Pfister) Nordstrand (1916-2011) reflects on the lessons learned while working at Seattle's Green Lake State Bank, where she worked for 10 years from the time she was...

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Librarian Natalie Notkin, unjustly accused of communism, defends herself in a letter to The Seattle Public Library's Board.

Natalie Notkin (1900-1970) was the Foreign Books librarian at The Seattle Public Library's Central branch from 1927 to 1932. Born in Kherson, Russia, Notkin emigrated in 1921, earned an undergraduate ...

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Librarian's Report: a Lament (Green Lake Branch, The Seattle Public Library, June 30, 1928)

This is a quarterly branch report written by Green Lake Branch librarian Ruth A. Dennis. In the report reprinted here, Dennis explains that the circulation numbers at her branch are down, particularly...

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Life in Seattle and Environs in the 1930s, 1940s and beyond -- as told by Margaret Reed

This People's History is an interview with Margaret Reed conducted by Jyl Leininger on April 7, 1999, in Seattle, Washington. Margaret Reed describes herself as an every-day individual. "Believe me, I...

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LightShows: A Reflection by Tom Robbins

This is an excerpt from an article by novelist Tom Robbins on the lightshows of the 1960s. It appeared in Seattle magazine in 1967, and is reprinted with permission of Tom Robbins.

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Livingston Brothers Mill (1863-1865), Everett

Harborview Park at 1631 W Mukilteo Boulevard in Everett is a popular place for picnics with an expansive northerly view of Possession Sound, the Tulalip Reservation, downtown Everett, Camano Island, G...

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Log Cowboy: A Story of Lake Union and Lake Washington by Dorothea Nordstrand

This story about Vern Nordstrand (1918-2009) and his job locating and returning stray logs to their log booms on Seattle's Lake Union and Lake Washington was contributed by Vern's widow, Dorothea Nord...

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Lost and Found -- A Japanese Flag's 65-year Journey Home

When Morey Skaret, resident of Fauntleroy (King County), now 95 years old, returned to Seattle after serving in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II, he brought with him a Japanese banzai flag he ...

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Lou Guzzo, managing editor, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, to Sally Raleigh, lifestyle editor, on the Equal Rights Amendment (1972)

Lou Guzzo (1919-2013), managing editor of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in the 1970s, sent this memo to Sally Raleigh, editor of the lifestyle section, on March 27, 1972. Guzzo was concerned about th...

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