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Topic: War & Peace

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Sano, Jean Kurosaka: War, Peace, and Friendship

The eventful life of Jean Kurosaka Sano, a Japanese American from Seattle who became a close friend of Joe and Ruth Caldbick soon after they moved to the city from rural Northern Ontario in 1929, is t...

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Schmoe, Floyd W. (1895-2001)

Floyd Schmoe's life, which more than spanned the twentieth century, was shaped by his love of nature and by his equally passionate commitment to helping those afflicted by war and injustice. A child o...

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Scott, Howard B. (1919-2012)

Marysville native Howard B. Scott was an ardent pacifist, dairy farmer, teacher, professor, and child psychologist. As a University of Washington student in 1937, Scott was repulsed by mandatory milit...

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Sea-Tac International Airport (Part 1)

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, or Sea-Tac as it commonly called, was developed as a direct response to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Military needs limited civilian a...

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Seattle Police Vigilantes: May 1970, An Eyewitness Account

David Wilma was a University Police Officer during the protests that broke out in early May 1970 in response to the United States entry into Cambodia, a neutral country, and in response to the killing...

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Seattle's Sister City Program

President Dwight Eisenhower created the Sister City program in 1956 to encourage the people-to-people exchange between Americans and citizens of other countries. Seattle was quick off the mark with th...

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Second Lieutenant Glenn W. Goodrich, Killed in Action, July 18, 1944

Colleen G. Armstrong of Des Moines, Washington, contributes this account of the death of her brother, Ellensburg High School graduate Second Lieutenant Glenn W. Goodrich, in France in 1944, and how he...

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Shaffer, Frank (1877-1950?)

Washington resident Frank Shaffer was a storekeeper, postmaster, farmer, inventor, and member of the International Bible Students Association in Everett. He was also involved in two important court ca...

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Shalikashvili, General John (1936-2011)

John Shalikashvili was born in Poland and immigrated with his family to the United States in 1952. He became a United States citizen in 1958 and was drafted into the army in 1959. Finding the army to ...

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Siting the Hanford Engineering Works: I was there, Leslie!

Louis Chesnut served in the Federal Land Bank system for 35 years, 10 years as vice president. This is his recollection of his involvement in the selection of the Hanford site for the development of t...

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Southeast Asian Americans

Never in the history of the United States have so many people come from the same region in so short a time under such dire circumstances as did the Southeast Asian refugees in the decade after 1975. O...

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Spokane Veterans Administration Memorial Hospital

World War II drew to a close in 1945, but there remained a great need for hospitals to treat the enormous numbers of veterans that returned home from the conflict. The City of Spokane was chosen as th...

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Sprague, John Wilson (1817-1893)

John Wilson Sprague was born in the state of New York, became a successful businessman in Ohio, served the Union cause with distinction during the Civil War, and then moved to the Northwest in 1870 as...

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Statement of Alonzo Russell, Seattle pioneer, on early Seattle days and the Indian War of 1856

This file presents the statement of Alonzo Russell (1839-1926), Seattle pioneer, on his arrival to the region in 1852 as a boy of 14, and on the Indian War of 1856. His statement, provided by Liz Russ...

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Station S (Fort Ward, Bainbridge Island)

In September 1939, the U.S. Navy relocated a secret radio listening post from Fort Stevens, Oregon, to Fort Ward on Bainbridge Island in Kitsap County, a few miles from Seattle in Puget Sound. The rad...

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Steptoe's Defeat: Battle of Tohotonimme (1858)

The year 1858 was the seminal turning point in conflict between Native American tribes of the Pacific Northwest and the encroaching interests of the United States. Fur traders, missionaries, and gold...

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Stone, General David L. (1876-1959)

Captain David Lamme Stone was the builder of Camp Lewis and later returned as a general to command Fort Lewis. He arrived on May 26, 1917, at American Lake, Washington, assigned to build a National Ar...

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Tacoma's Hooverville: Hollywood on the Tideflats

Shack towns and homeless encampments – "Hoovervilles" – multiplied in Washington before and during the Great Depression. In Tacoma, an encampment near the city garbage dump cover...

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The Seattle Seven Conspiracy Trial

In February 1970, a group of young Vietnam war protestors calling themselves the Seattle Liberation Front found themselves in legal hot water when they were charged with inciting a riot through the st...

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The Women's Movement and Radical Politics in Seattle, 1964-1980

This is an exerpt from an interview with Dotty DeCoster conducted by HistoryLink's Heather MacIntosh in April 2000. DeCoster was an outspoken member of the Women's Movement in the late 1960s and 1970s...

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Threatening Skies: Memories of World War II in West Seattle

Norma Milliman recounts her discovery of World War II flyers dropped in West Seattle: "I have vivid memories of the sky turning dark with airplanes flying over the water. The sound they made was a dee...

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To Resign or Not: Southern Officers in Washington Territory on the Eve of the Civil War

On the eve of the Civil War, United States Army regiments west of the Rocky Mountains were little more than a frontier police force, isolated, undermanned, underpaid, and poorly provisioned. The situa...

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Top Secret Hanford: How Franklin Roosevelt and his Underlings Hid the Truth About the Atomic Bomb

Today much is known about the atomic bombs that devastated Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, and brought an end to World War II. But in the 1940s, the work being done on the Manhattan Project – inc...

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Treaty of Medicine Creek, 1854

The Treaty of Medicine Creek was made on December 26, 1854, at Medicine Creek in present-day Thurston County between the United States and members of the Puyallup, Nisqually, Steilacoom, and Squaxin I...

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