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Topic: War & Peace

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Seattle's Sister City Program

President Dwight Eisenhower created the Sister City program in 1956 to encourage the people-to-people exchange between Americans and citizens of other countries. Seattle was quick off the mark with th...

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Second Lieutenant Glenn W. Goodrich, Killed in Action, July 18, 1944

Colleen G. Armstrong of Des Moines, Washington, contributes this account of the death of her brother, Ellensburg High School graduate Second Lieutenant Glenn W. Goodrich, in France in 1944, and how he...

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Shaffer, Frank (1877-1950?)

Washington resident Frank Shaffer was a storekeeper, postmaster, farmer, inventor, and member of the International Bible Students Association in Everett. He was also involved in two important court ca...

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Shalikashvili, General John (1936-2011)

John Shalikashvili was born in Poland and immigrated with his family to the United States in 1952. He became a United States citizen in 1958 and was drafted into the army in 1959. Finding the army to ...

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Siting the Hanford Engineering Works: I was there, Leslie!

Louis Chesnut served in the Federal Land Bank system for 35 years, 10 years as vice president. This is his recollection of his involvement in the selection of the Hanford site for the development of t...

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Southeast Asian Americans

Never in the history of the United States have so many people come from the same region in so short a time under such dire circumstances as did the Southeast Asian refugees in the decade after 1975. O...

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Spokane Veterans Administration Memorial Hospital

World War II drew to a close in 1945, but there remained a great need for hospitals to treat the enormous numbers of veterans that returned home from the conflict. The City of Spokane was chosen as th...

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Sprague, John Wilson (1817-1893)

John Wilson Sprague was born in the state of New York, became a successful businessman in Ohio, served the Union cause with distinction during the Civil War, and then moved to the Northwest in 1870 as...

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Statement of Alonzo Russell, Seattle pioneer, on early Seattle days and the Indian War of 1856

This file presents the statement of Alonzo Russell (1839-1926), Seattle pioneer, on his arrival to the region in 1852 as a boy of 14, and on the Indian War of 1856. His statement, provided by Liz Russ...

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Station S (Fort Ward, Bainbridge Island)

In September 1939, the U.S. Navy relocated a secret radio listening post from Fort Stevens, Oregon, to Fort Ward on Bainbridge Island in Kitsap County, a few miles from Seattle in Puget Sound. The rad...

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Steptoe's Defeat: Battle of Tohotonimme (1858)

The year 1858 was the seminal turning point in conflict between Native American tribes of the Pacific Northwest and the encroaching interests of the United States. Fur traders, missionaries, and gold...

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Stone, General David L. (1876-1959)

Captain David Lamme Stone was the builder of Camp Lewis and later returned as a general to command Fort Lewis. He arrived on May 26, 1917, at American Lake, Washington, assigned to build a National Ar...

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The Women's Movement and Radical Politics in Seattle, 1964-1980

This is an exerpt from an interview with Dotty DeCoster conducted by HistoryLink's Heather MacIntosh in April 2000. DeCoster was an outspoken member of the Women's Movement in the late 1960s and 1970s...

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Threatening Skies: Memories of World War II in West Seattle

Norma Milliman recounts her discovery of World War II flyers dropped in West Seattle: "I have vivid memories of the sky turning dark with airplanes flying over the water. The sound they made was a dee...

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To Resign or Not: Southern Officers in Washington Territory on the Eve of the Civil War

On the eve of the Civil War, United States Army regiments west of the Rocky Mountains were little more than a frontier police force, isolated, undermanned, underpaid, and poorly provisioned. The situa...

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Treaty of Medicine Creek, 1854

The Treaty of Medicine Creek was signed on December 26, 1854, at a meeting at Medicine Creek in present-day Thurston County. Sixty-two leaders of major Western Washington tribes, including the Nisqual...

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Treaty with the Walla Walla, Cayuse, and Umatilla, 1855

The Treaty with the Walla Walla, Cayuse, and Umatilla was signed by signed by Isaac Stevens (1818-1862), Governor of Washington Territory, and by Pio-pio-mox-mox, chief of the Walla Wallas, Weyatenate...

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Treaty with the Yakama, 1855

The Treaty with the Yakama was signed on June 9, 1855, by Isaac Stevens (1818-1862), Governor of Washington Territory, and by Chief Kamiakin (spelled "Kamaiakun" in the treaty) and other tribal leader...

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Triangle of Fire - The Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound (1897-1953)

Admiralty Inlet was considered so strategic to the defense of Puget Sound at the turn of the century that three forts were built at the entrance with huge guns creating a "Triangle of Fire" that could...

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Turning Point 16: When Worlds Collide: From Contact to Conquest on Puget Sound

The 16th essay in HistoryLink's Turning Point series for The Seattle Times focuses on the cultural interactions between Puget Sound's Native peoples and the first European explorers and early settlers...

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University District Museum Without Walls Oral History: Vivian McPeak (founder, Seattle Peace Heathens; executive director, Seattle Hempfest)

Vivian McPeak, a resident of Seattle's University District, is the founder of Seattle Peace Heathens, executive director of Seattle Hempfest, and a local peace and social-justice activist. This is a t...

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USS Missouri

The USS Missouri (BB-63), moored at Bremerton's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 1954 to 1984, was the last battleship commissioned by the United States Navy and the second battleship to bear the name ...

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Vietnam: The War We Won -- A Talk by Walt Crowley (1984)

This is a talk on the Vietnam War presented by Walt Crowley (1947-2007) in September 1984 at the Seattle Center. Walt was invited to speak as a writer for the "anti-war tabloid," Helix, to a gathering...

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Vigilantes Pummel Demonstrators at UW in May 1970: An Eyewitness Account

On May 7, 1970, Bill Kennedy, then a University of Washington student, witnessed a surprisingly brutal vigilante retaliation against anti-war demonstrators. He recounts his memories and feelings that ...

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