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John Low and Lee Terry select claims at Alki Point on September 28, 1851.

On September 28, 1851, John Low (1820-1888) and Leander (Lee) Terry (1818-1862) select Donation Land claims on Alki Point not far from the future site of Seattle. David Denny (1832-1903) and Lee Terry...

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Denny Party lands at Alki Point near future Seattle on November 13, 1851.

On November 13, 1851, the Denny Party lands at Alki Point, not far from the site of the future Seattle.

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Charles Terry opens first store in future King County no later than November 28, 1851.

No later than November 28, 1851, Charles C. Terry (1828-1867) opens a store on Alki Point. This is the first store in the future King County. Terry arrived at Alki Point with the Denny party on the sc...

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Settlers begin loading logs on the ship Leonesa in King County's first export on December 9, 1851.

On December 9, 1851, all seven adult male settlers at New York (renamed Alki) begin cutting down trees and loading lumber on the ship Leonesa, bound for San Francisco. This represents the future King ...

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The schooner Robert Bruce burns in Willapa Bay, leading to the settlement of Bruceville (later Bruceport), on December 11, 1851.

On December 11, 1851, the schooner Robert Bruce is deliberately set on fire by the ship's cook and burns to the water line. The schooner is in Willapa Bay in what is now Pacific County in southwest Wa...

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Denny, Boren, and Bell select claims on Elliott Bay marking the beginning of Seattle on February 15, 1852.

On February 15, 1852, Arthur Denny (1822-1899), Carson Boren (1824-1912), and William Bell (1817-1887) select Donation Land claim sites on the eastern portion of Elliott Bay. Most of the original sett...

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The first non-Indian families arrive at the new settlement of Port Townsend on February 23, 1852.

On February 23, 1852, the families of Loren and Lucinda Hastings and Francis and Sophia Pettygrove arrive at the site of Port Townsend with another family and several single men. They are the first no...

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David "Doc" Maynard arrives at Alki Point on March 31, 1852.

On March 31, 1852, David "Doc" Maynard arrives at Alki Point. He has come from Olympia in a canoe paddled by Chief Seattle and other Duwamish Indians.

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Nicholas Delin begins construction of a sawmill at the head of Commencement Bay on April 1, 1852.

On April 1, 1852, Nicholas Delin (1817-1882) begins construction of a water-powered sawmill at the head of Commencement Bay in what will become Tacoma. By the end of the year, the mill will be cutting...

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Saint Joseph's Mission at Ahtanum Creek is founded in the Yakima Valley on April 3, 1852.

On April 3, 1852, Father Louis Joseph D'herbomez and Father Charles M. Pandosy found a mission on Ahtanum Creek in what will become known as the Yakima Valley. They call the mission Saint Joseph (not ...

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First contingent of Denny party relocates to site of Seattle on April 3, 1852.

On April 3, 1852, the first contingent of the Denny party relocates from Alki Point to the eastern shore of Elliott Bay, the site of future downtown Seattle. Those who make the move on April 3 are: Wi...

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First irrigation ditch in the Yakima Valley is dug at the Saint Joseph Mission in 1852.

In 1852, Catholic Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate Father Charles Pandosy and Father Eugene Casmire Chirouse (1821-1892), in company with Yakama people, labor with shovels to dig the first irriga...

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Charles Terry homesteads site of Alki business district on May 1, 1852.

On May 1, 1852, Charles C. Terry (1829-1867) officially homesteads on Alki Point. Many decades later, on this site, a West Seattle business district known as the Alki starts operating at about the int...

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Bishop Demers holds Seattle's first Christian religious ceremony on August 22, 1852.

On August 22, 1852, at the invitation of Arthur Denny (1822-1899), visiting Bishop Modeste Demers (1809-1871) celebrates Mass in Henry Yesler's sawmill cookhouse. Although the town has no Catholic set...

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The Columbian, Washington's first newspaper, is published in Olympia on September 11, 1852.

On September 11, 1852, The Columbian, Washington's first newspaper, is published in Olympia. Washington is not yet a territory, much less a state, and Olympia is identified in the paper's front-page b...

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Captain Ulysses S. Grant arrives at Columbia (later Vancouver) Barracks on September 20, 1852.

On September 20, 1852, Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), then a 30-year-old Brevet Captain, later a famed Civil War general and United States President, arrives with the 4th Infantry regiment at Columbia ...

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Seattle Beginnings: first Seattle Post Office opens on October 12, 1852.

The opening of a post office is an important marker of the beginning of a community. On October 12, 1852, the first Seattle Post Office is established. Arthur A. Denny (1822-1899) is appointed postmas...

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Henry Yesler arrives in Seattle on October 20, 1852.

On October 20, 1852, Henry Yesler (1810-1892) arrives in Seattle. He had come from Ohio via California and Portland, and was seeking a suitable site for a steam-powered mill. The land on the Elliott B...

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Seattle appears in print for the first time on October 30, 1852.

On October 30, 1852, the Olympia newspaper The Columbian prints an advertisement for Dr. David S. Maynard's store, the "Seattle Exchange." This (and a notice in the same issue about Henry Yesler's saw...

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Yesler's Mill, the first steam-powered sawmill on Puget Sound, is under construction in Seattle on October 30, 1852.

On October 30, 1852, the Olympia newspaper The Columbian reports that "a new steam mill is in process of erection by Mr. H. L. Yesler [Henry Yesler] at Seattle." The region's first steam-powered saw m...

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Henry Roeder and Russell Peabody establish Whatcom Mill on Bellingham Bay in December 1852.

In December 1852, Captain Henry Roeder and Captain Russell V. Peabody establish Whatcom Mill on Bellingham Bay. It is one of the first American settlements at what will become the city of Bellingham.

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Oregon Territorial Legislature creates King County and names Seattle county seat on December 22, 1852.

On December 22, 1852, the Oregon Territorial Legislature approves creation of King County and names Seattle as the seat of its government. The legislation is sponsored by Col. Isaac Ebey (1818-1857) t...

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Oregon Territorial Legislature creates Pierce County on December 22, 1852.

On December 22, 1852, the Oregon Territorial legislature in Salem creates Pierce County. It does so by partitioning off a portion of Thurston County. Pierce County, along with Island, Jefferson, Kin...

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Manuel Lopes (1812-?), Seattle's first black citizen, arrives in 1852.

Manuel Lopes (1812-?), Seattle's first black citizen, arrives in 1852. Lopes is a barber and his barbershop is the village's first black-owned business. He plays the snare drum, and is known for hi...

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