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Topic: Asian & Pacific Islander Americans

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Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Chinese Village

The Chinese Village was built for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition in Seattle in 1909. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people....

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Anti-Chinese Activism -- Seattle

Chinese immigrants, largely men, began arriving in Seattle in the 1860s, and played a key role in the development of Washington Territory, providing labor for the region's mines and salmon canneries a...

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Arai, Kichio Allen (1901-1966)

Kichio Allen Arai was Seattle's first Asian American architect to design buildings under his own name. Arai's approach to design integrated Japanese aesthetics with American conventions. Arai's career...

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Auburn: A Reminiscence of Childhood by Joseph Koch

Joseph Koch (1920-2000) was a longtime resident of Auburn, a small town located in south King County only a few miles from the Pierce County border. From the time of his retirement in 1962, Joe was on...

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Bulosan, Carlos (1911?-1956)

Carlos Bulosan was a prolific writer and poet, best remembered as the author of America Is in the Heart, a landmark semi-autobiographical story about the Filipino immigrant experience. Bulosan gained ...

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Camp Harmony (Puyallup Assembly Center), 1942

The Puyallup Assembly Center, better known by the euphemism Camp Harmony, a name coined by an Army public-relations officer during construction in 1942, was situated at the Western Washington fairgrou...

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Chinese Americans

Chinese immigrants played a critical role in the development of Washington Territory and of Seattle. By 1880, more than 3,000 Chinese lived in Washington Territory and worked in various industries.

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Chinese Workers in the San Juan Islands

In the late nineteenth century a few Chinese immigrants found work in the San Juan Islands in domestic service, on farms, or in mining and logging camps, but most Chinese laborers came to the islands ...

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Chow, Ruby (1920-2008)

Ruby Chow was dubbed a "living legend" (Rhodes) for her 50-year career as a restaurateur, Chinese community pioneer, civic activist, public official, and a major bridge between Seattle's Chinese commu...

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project

Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project is a Seattle-based nonprofit organization founded in 1996. The word Densho means "to pass on to the next generation," and this concept of legacy lies squar...

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Filipino Americans in Seattle

With an estimated population of 30,000 (in the late 1990s), the Filipino American community forms the largest group of Asian Americans in the Seattle area. Beginning with the first known Filipino resi...

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Filipino Cannery Workers

As early as the 1920s, Filipinos from Seattle were contracted to work in Alaskan canneries. Later efforts at reform of contracting practices led to assassinations of Filipino union organizers in the 1...

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"Good Things Grow From Horse Manure": A Speech to the Seattle Rotary Club by Sam Mitsui

Sam Mitsui gave this speech to the Rotary Club of Seattle at the 5th Avenue Theatre on November 9, 2005. Mitsui is a member of the Nisei Veterans Committee of Seattle, Washington. His speech begins, "...

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Goon Dip (ca. 1862-1933).

Goon Dip was a phenomenon -- a visionary and wealthy entrepreneur, public servant, philanthropist, and the most influential Chinese in the Pacific Coast during the early years of the twentieth centur...

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Guiang, Mariano (1904-1992) Filipino Boxer

Mariano Guiang (1904-1992), a Filipino boxer, emigrated from the Philippines to live in Seattle, arriving at the age of 19 on June 12, 1924. This is a reminiscence excerpted from a longer interview co...

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Hawaiian Music and its Historic Seattle Connection

The distinctive music of the Hawaiian Islands is easily recognizable -- its signature thrumming of a 'ukulele, thwacking of bamboo percussion sticks (puili), and keening "steel guitar" lines are, toda...

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Higo Variety Store (Seattle)

The Higo 10 Cent Store (later Higo Variety Store, located in Seattle at 602-608 S Jackson Street) represents one of the few threads linking the bustle of Seattle's Japantown of the 1930s to recent eff...

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Hirabayashi, Gordon K. (1918-2012)

In a remarkable show of personal courage, Auburn native Gordon Hirabayashi was one of handful of Japanese Americans nationwide to defy U.S. government curfew and "evacuation" orders issued in 1942 (in...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Bettie Luke Recalls Marches Commemorating Anniversaries of 1886 Chinese Expulsion

Bettie Luke (b. 1942) helped Ben Woo (1923-2008) organize a march in 1986 to mark the centennial of the 1886 expulsion of Chinese residents from Seattle and led the effort to commemorate the 125th ann...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Marie Wong Discusses Her Research on Seattle's SRO Hotels and the Men and Women Who Lived in Them

Marie Wong is an associate professor at Seattle University's Institute of Public Service, sits on the board of InterIm Community Development Corporation, and is public-information advisor to the Kong ...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Max Chan Recalls Her Work with Migrant Workers, Immigrants, and Residents of Seattle's SRO Hotels

Maxine "Max" Chan (b. 1955) is a food anthropologist and a community activist who has researched the evolution of Chinese cuisine in the Pacific Northwest. She has also worked in social services in th...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Mike Omura Discusses His Experiences on the Seattle Waterfront

Mike Omura (b. 1948) is a Seattle architect whose personal and professional lives have involved the Seattle waterfront. He traveled from Japan to Seattle in about 1958 on the Hikawa Maru, a Nippon Yus...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Teresa Woo-Murray Talks About Her Great-great-grandfather, Chun Ching Hock, Seattle's First Chinese Immigrant and One of Its First Entrepreneurs

Teresa Woo-Murray is an artist and the great-great-granddaughter of Chun Ching Hock (1844-1927), Seattle's first Chinese immigrant, and she has done extensive research into his life and businesses. Wo...

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Historic South Downtown Oral Histories: Tony Chinn Discusses His Experiences on the Seattle Waterfront

Tony Chinn (b. 1947), who grew up in the Chinatown-International District neighborhood, was interviewed in April 2015 as part of a project HistoryLink did in partnership with Historic South Downtown t...

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