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Topic: Landmarks

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Seattle Landmarks: Firehouse No. 33 (1914)

Address: 10235 62nd Avenue South, Seattle. Old Firehouse #33 was built in 1914 to accomodate a single, horse-drawn fire engine of the Seattle Fire Department. It was designed in a modified Tudor style...

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Seattle Landmarks: Frank D. Black Property (1914)

Address: 1319 12th Avenue S, Seattle. In about 1896, businessman Frank D. Black (1854-1919) (Seattle Hardware Co, real estate) built a Swiss chalet style home on three acres on the west side of Beacon...

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Seattle Landmarks: George F. Cotterill House (1910)

Address: 2501 Westview Drive W, Seattle. George F. Cotterill (1865-1958) was Seattle's mayor from 1912 to 1914. He was trained as an engineer and came to Seattle in 1884. He worked for Reginald H. Tho...

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Seattle Landmarks: Handschy/Kistler House (1909)

Address: 2433 9th Avenue W, Seattle. Andrew Willatzen (Willatsen after 1920) (1876-1974) and Barry Byrne (b. 1883) both apprenticed under Architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1869-1959) at his Oak Park, Illi...

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Seattle Landmarks: James W. Washington Jr. Home and Studio (1918)

Address: 1816 26th Avenue, Seattle. Sculptor James W. Washington Jr. (1911-2000) migrated from Mississippi in 1944 to work as an electrician in the Bremerton Naval Shipyard. He was already a skilled p...

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Seattle Landmarks: Kraus/Andersson House (1911)

Address: 2812 Mount St. Helens Place, Seattle. Industrialist Joseph Kraus built this three-story residence in 1911 on 1/6 of an acre in the Mount Baker neighborhood. It was designed by architect J.E. ...

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Seattle Landmarks: Lacey V. Murrow Floating Bridge and East Portals of the Mount Baker Tunnels (1940)

Address: Interstate 90 and Lake Washington, Seattle. When it was completed in 1940, the Lake Washington Floating Bridge was the longest bridge of its kind in the world. The floating concrete structu...

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Seattle Landmarks: McFee/Klockzien House (1909)

Address: 524 W Highland Drive, Seattle. John G. McFee (b. 1863) came to Seattle in 1890 and became a successful railroad contractor and businessman. In 1909, the firm of Spalding and Umbrecht desi...

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Seattle Landmarks: Parsons House (1905)

Address: 618 W Highland Drive, Seattle. Reginald H. Parsons (1873-1955) came to Seattle in 1903 to represent the Bemis Bag Co. He branched out into mining, and into agricultural and financial business...

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Seattle Landmarks: Parsons Memorial Gardens (1905)

Address: Immediately west of 618 W Highland Drive, Seattle. In 1956, the children of Reginald H. Parsons (1873-1955) and Maude (Bemis) Parsons (d. 1955) provided this 16,552-square-foot garden to the ...

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Seattle Landmarks: Queen Anne Drive Bridge (1936)

Address: Queen Anne Drive between 2nd Avenue N and Nob Hill Avenue N, Seattle. The bridge across Wolf Creek, on the north side of Queen Anne Hill is a steel arch bridge, 238 feet long. The parabolic t...

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Seattle Landmarks: Raymond/Ogden Residence (1912)

Address: 702 35th Avenue, Seattle. Joseph S. Cote (b. 1874) designed a Georgian mansion in the Madrona neighborhood for Seattle surgeon Dr. Alfred Raymond (1860-1919). Cote was described as an archael...

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Seattle Landmarks: Samuel Hyde Residence (1910)

Address: 3726 E Madison Street. Seattle architects Bebb and Mendel designed a Neo-classical mansion for liquor dealer Samuel Hyde in 1909. The building had two stories, and an adjacent brick carriage ...

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Seattle Landmarks: Seattle Hebrew Academy (Old Forest Ridge Convent) (1909)

Address: 1617 Interlaken Drive E, Seattle. The Roman Catholic Sisters of the Sacred Heart built a convent and day school in Interlaken Park in 1909. The sisters picked the site for its remoteness from...

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Seattle Landmarks: Stuart/Balcom House and Gardens (1926)

Address: 619 W Comstock Street, Seattle. Deette McAuslan Smith (1892-1979) built the imposing brick residence on the south slope of Queen Anne Hill in 1926. She was the widow of contractor Grant Smith...

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Seattle Landmarks: West Queen Anne Walls (1913)

Address: 8th Place W between W Galer Street and W Highland Drive, Seattle. In 1906, members of the Queen Anne Community Club peititioned the Seattle Parks Board for a scenic boulevard around Queen Ann...

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Seattle Landmarks: William H. Thompson House (1894)

Address: 3119 S Day Street, Seattle. In 1894, Ernest A. MacKay built an 18-room mansion in the Mount Baker district. He chose a late Victorian Queen Anne design with a three-story octagonal tower, sca...

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Seattle Neighborhoods: Seattle Center -- Thumbnail History

The Seattle Center, located north of downtown at the foot of Queen Anne Hill, is a cultural and entertainment campus built in 1962 for the Seattle World's Fair. The World's Fair helped to transform Se...

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Sicks' Stadium (Seattle)

Sicks' Stadium, built in 1938, was a Seattle landmark for more than four decades. Located in Rainier Valley at the intersection of Rainier Avenue and McClelland Street, the baseball stadium was home t...

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Smith Tower (Seattle)

When Seattle's pyramid-capped Smith Tower officially opened on July 4, 1914, its greatest claim to fame was its 462-foot height. It was originally one of the tallest buildings in the country outside o...

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South Lake Union (Seattle) Self-Guided Walking Tour

When Seattle was founded in 1851, Lake Union was the backwater of a backwater town. A natural dam at Montlake sealed it off from Lake Washington, while only a tiny stream through Fremont drained it in...

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Space Needle (Seattle)

The Space Needle, a modernistic totem of the Seattle World's Fair, was conceived by Eddie Carlson (1911-1990) as a doodle in 1959 and given form by architects John Graham Jr. (1908-1991), Victor Stein...

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Virginia V -- Last Mosquito Fleet Steamer

Built by Matthew Anderson on the beach at Maplewood, Pierce County, Virginia V was launched on March 9, 1922. She was the last of a line of working steamers all bearing the name "Virginia," owned and ...

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Washington Hall (Seattle)

Washington Hall, located at 153 14th Avenue in Seattle's Squire Park neighborhood, began its life as the headquarters of Lodge No. 29 of the Danish Brotherhood in America, a fraternal organization. Lo...

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