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Topic: Northwest Indians

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Coast Salish Reef-net Fishery, Part 2

Coast Salish peoples of the San Juan Islands and southern Gulf Islands used their unique reef-net fishing technology to harvest large quantities of sockeye salmon as the fish passed through the island...

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Coast Salish Woolly Dogs

Weaving with spun yarns was a defining characteristic of pre-Contact Coast Salish civilization in the Salish Sea (the marine waterways of what are now Washington and British Columbia), together with t...

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Comcomly (1760s?-1830)

Comcomly was a leading figure among the Chinook Indian bands who lived along the lower Columbia River during the period of contact between Native American tribes and Euro-American fur traders. Comcoml...

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Comeford, James Purcell (1833-1909)

James Purcell Comeford first arrived in Snohomish County in 1872 and ran a trading post on the Tulalip Reservation for six years. He founded Marysville in 1878, naming it after his wife Maria. He buil...

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Covington, Lucy Friedlander (1910-1982)

Lucy Friedlander Covington (1910-1982) was born in Nespelem on the Colville Indian Reservation and was a lifelong advocate for Colville tribal rights and land, becoming well-known and nationally ...

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Cowley, Michael M. (1841-1915), Spokane pioneer

The author of this People's History, Benjamin H. Kizer, was a Spokane lawyer acquainted with local pioneer Michael M. Cowley. Cowley worked as a sutler (an Army storekeeper) and prospector, settled at...

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Curtis, Edward S. (1868-1952)

Edward Curtis was one of the most prominent figures in the cultural history of Washington state. He is acknowledged as one of the leading American photographers of his time and has produced iconic por...

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DeLaCruz, Joseph "Joe" Burton (1937-2000)

Joseph "Joe" Burton DeLaCruz Jr., long-serving president of the Quinault Indian Nation, brought intelligence and charisma to the struggle to bring effective self-governance to his tribe and to Indians...

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Dorothea Nordstrand remembers the Lauth Family

In this People's History, Dorothea (Pfister) Nordstrand (1916-2011) remembers family visits from Seattle to a family lot in Suquamish, Kitsap County, and the friendship that grew up between the Pfiste...

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Dover, Harriette Shelton Williams (1904-1991)

Daughter of Chief William Shelton -- the famed Tulalip storyteller, wood-carver, and cultural leader -- Harriette Shelton Williams Dover, followed her father's fine example and invested her entire adu...

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Duwamish Gardens (Ray-Carrossino Farmstead)

Duwamish Gardens, a park in the south King County city of Tukwila, was previously a farmstead and truck farm on the Duwamish River. The land was settled and farmed by the Thomas Ray (1852-1940) family...

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Duwamish-Green Watershed

The Duwamish-Green Watershed in King County comprises 492 square miles of forests, meadows, hills, and valleys that have been shaped by environmental forces and generations of human activities. The wa...

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Elementary Level: Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle's parents were from tribes on both sides of Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River. He lived during a time of change for his people and the Puget Sound region. He welcomed the Collins and De...

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Elementary Level: Fort Walla Walla

Between 1818 and 1910, there were four outposts named Fort Walla Walla. The first Fort Walla Walla was established as a fur-trading post by the North West Company. The next two were built to house U.S...

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Elementary Level: Horses Change Life on the Columbia Plateau

Hundreds of years ago, the Native Americans who lived in Washington's Columbia Plateau region had no means of traveling on land other than walking. That all changed when local Indian groups began to a...

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Elementary Level: Kennewick Man

The skull and bones of a man who lived more than 9,000 years ago were discovered in 1996 near Kennewick. Archaeologists realized that these remains were very rare. Some wanted to have the opportunity ...

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Elementary Level: Legends from Washington State Tribes

For thousands of years, Native Americans preserved their history in a special way. They passed down their traditions and culture to the next generation by means of oral tradition -- or storytelling. A...

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Elementary Level: Makah Whaling

The culture and lifestyle of the Makah Indians is based on the sea. Their homeland is on the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington, along the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the coastli...

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Elementary Level: Marcus and Narcissa Whitman -- Missionaries of the Walla Walla Valley

Marcus and Narcissa Whitman were missionaries who came to the Walla Walla Valley from New York. They wanted to teach Indians about their religion. They also wanted the Indians to change the way they w...

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Elementary Level: Marmes Rockshelter

The Marmes Rockshelter was a very important archaeological find in Washington. Tools, human bones, and a cremation hearth more than 8,000 years old were discovered there. But scientists had a big prob...

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Elementary Level: Princess Angeline, Daughter of Chief Seattle

Kikisoblu, the daughter of Chief Seattle was a friend to early Seattle pioneers. One of the pioneer women, Catherine Maynard, thought Kikisoblu should have a name that would let everyone know that she...

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Elementary Level: Transportation on Lake Washington

For thousands of years, people who lived on Lake Washington have used its waters in their daily lives. In the last 150 years, the methods of crossing the lake to transport goods and people from one si...

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Everett Bayside: A Tour

This tour of Everett's Bayside waterfront was written by Margaret Riddle and curated by Paula Becker. The map is by Marie McCaffrey, and the tour is sponsored by the Henry M. Jackson Foundation.

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Finlay, Jacques Raphael "Jaco" (1768-1828)

Jacques Raphael Finlay, a Canadian fur trader commonly known as Jaco, crossed the Continental Divide in modern-day Alberta and reached the upper Columbia River during the summer of 1806. Working as an...

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