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David Thompson records first written description of the Sanpoil Indians and the landscape along the Columbia between Kettle Falls and the mouth of the Sanpoil River on July 3, 1811.

On July 3, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) embarks from Kettle Falls on a historic voyage down the Columbia River to the Pacific. In addition to his scientific work as a geographe...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Nespelem Indians and landscape along the Columbia from the mouth of the Sanpoil through Nespelem Canyon on July 4 and July 5, 1811.

On July 4-5, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Nespelem Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Sanpoil R...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Methow Indians and landscape along the Columbia between Nespelem Canyon and the mouth of the Wenatchee on July 6, 1811.

On July 6, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770 - 1857) records the first written description of the Methow Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Nespelem Canyon to the mouth...

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David Thompson records first written description of the Sinkayuse Indians and the landscape along the Columbia between the mouth of the Wenatchee River and Crab Creek on July 7, 1811.

On July 7, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Sinkayuse Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from the mouth of the Wenatchee ...

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David Thompson records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and of the landscape along the Columbia between Crab Creek (present-day Grant County) and the mouth of the Snake River (near present-day Pasco and Kennewick) on July 8-9, 1811.

On July 8-9, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) records the first written description of the Wanapum Indians and the landscape along the Columbia River from Crab Creek (present-day Gra...

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David Thompson plants the British flag at the confluence of the Columbia and Snake rivers on July 9, 1811.

On July 9, 1811, at the mouth of the Snake River where it joins the Columbia, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) erects a pole with a sign claiming the surrounding country for Great Britain....

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David Thompson of the North West Company surveys Celilo Falls, The Dalles, and Cascades Rapids on the lower Columbia River beginning on July 13, 1811.

On July 11, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches Celilo Falls on the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. Over the next three days, Thompson survey...

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David Thompson, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company, reaches the mouth of the Columbia River and meets with Pacific Fur Company agents at Astoria on July 15, 1811.

On July 15, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) reaches the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. In addition to his scientific work as a geog...

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David Thompson surveys Cape Disappointment, visits a Chinook village near the mouth of Columbia River, and meets Chief Comcomly on July 18, 1811.

On July 18, 1811, Canadian explorer and agent of the North West Company David Thompson (1770-1857) surveys the mouth of the Columbia River after a historic voyage downriver from Kettle Falls. The firs...

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Representatives from the North West Company of Canada and the Pacific Fur Company of New York make the first ascent of the lower Columbia River for commercial purposes beginning on July 22, 1811.

From July 22 to 31, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) ascends the lower Columbia River, accompanied by members of the Pacific Fur Company of New York, who have just established a post...

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David Thompson visits Palus Indians along the lower Snake River and records the first written description of an overland trail from the mouth of the Palouse River to the Spokane River between August 5 and August 13, 1811.

In early August 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) and a small crew ascend the lower Snake River, visiting a succession of Palus Indian encampments along the way. At a village at the ...

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First Hawaiian to visit the Inland Northwest reaches Spokane House on August 13, 1811.

On August 13, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) and his crew arrive at the fur-trading post Spokane House on their return from the Pacific, bringing with them a Hawaiian Islander whom...

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Fur trader Alexander Ross arrives at the mouth of the Yakima River on August 16, 1811.

On August 16, 1811, Alexander Ross, a trader and explorer with Astor's Pacific Fur Company goes up the Columbia River and arrives at the mouth of Yakima River. There he encounters a number of Indians ...

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Astorians name Priest Rapids on August 18, 1811.

On August 18, 1811, members of the Pacific Fur Company, known as the Astorians, name Priest Rapids on the Columbia River in honor of a tribal leader they meet there. Priest Rapids is located north of ...

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Astorians reach site of Fort Okanogan at the junction of the Okanogan and Columbia rivers on August 31, 1811.

On August 31, 1811, members of the Pacific Fur Company, known as the Astorians, reach the junction of the Okanogan and Columbia rivers, where they build Fort Okanogan, the first American trading post ...

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David Thompson travels from Kettle Falls to Boat Encampment on the Columbia River beginning on September 2, 1811.

In early September, 1811, Canadian explorer David Thompson (1770-1857) travels from Kettle Falls to Boat Encampment on the Columbia River, where he completes the first scientific survey of the entire ...

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John Jacob Astor's Pacific Fur Company establishes Fort Spokane in 1812.

In 1812, the Pacific Fur Company of John Jacob Astor (1763-1848), a New York merchant active in the fur trade with China, establishes a trading post called Fort Spokane near the current site of the ci...

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Astorians Donald Mackenzie and Robert McClellan descend the Snake River to the Columbia River in early January 1812.

In early January, 1812, Pacific Fur Company partners Donald Mackenzie (1783-1851) and Robert McClellan (1770-1815) descend the Snake River to the Columbia in present-day Washington state. Mackenzie an...

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Astorian Wilson Price Hunt reaches the Columbia River near the mouth of the Umatilla on January 19, 1812.

On January 19, 1812, Pacific Fur Company partner Wilson Price Hunt (1783-1842) reaches the Columbia River near the mouth of the Umatilla and travels downstream on a tribal trail along the north side o...

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David Thompson concludes first scientific survey of the Columbia River and departs Kettle Falls for Montreal on April 22, 1812.

On April 22, 1812, David Thompson (1770-1857), Canadian explorer, geographer, and fur trader, departs Kettle Falls and canoes upstream on the Columbia River, bound for eastern Canada. Thompson, a part...

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Ship Beaver reaches the Columbia River on May 9, 1812.

On May 9, 1812, the ship Beaver, commissioned by John Jacob Astor, reaches the Columbia River, bringing supplies and reinforcements for the Pacific Fur Company, whose charter members had established a...

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U.S. Congress votes to declare war on Great Britain on June 18, 1812.

On June 18, 1812, the U.S. Congress votes to declare war on Great Britain, and President James Madison (1751-1836) signs a Proclamation of War. New York entrepreneur John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) reali...

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John McTavish brings news of war to Spokane House in mid-November 1812.

In mid-November, 1812, John G. McTavish (ca. 1778-1847) of the North West Company brings news of the outbreak of War of 1812 to Spokane House (near present-day Spokane). This is the first knowledge of...

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During the War of 1812, a North West Company vessel carrying supplies departs eastern Canada for the Columbia River on March 25, 1813.

March 25, 1813, the ship Isaac Todd, owned by the North West Company of Montreal, departs Portsmouth en route to the Columbia River with supplies for the company's fur trading posts in the Northwest. ...

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